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3-D Printed Martian Igloo Wins NASA Habitat Contest

posted: 10/02/15
by: Danny Clemens
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Will NASA's first Martian colony be built from ice?

The agency has awarded the first place prize in its 3-D Printed Mars Habitat Contest to the visually stunning Mars Ice House, a sleek structure that aims to harness the Red Planet's liquid water and low temperatures to build a "multi-layered pressurized radiation shell of ice."

Mars ice house concept
Team Space Exploration Architecture and Clouds Architecture Office

The structure is essentially a series of nested ice shells. A novel "front yard" pocket between the structure's outer shell and interior domes will allow Mars astronauts to experience a "truly unique protected neutral zone that is not entirely interior or exterior". Just inside the front yard, a lush hydroponic garden will provide both food and oxygen to the structure's residents.

Nested ice domes
Team Space Exploration Architecture and Clouds Architecture Office

Ongoing NASA research focuses on the potential negative effects of long-term spaceflight on the human mind and body -- concerns that were not lost on the team behind the concept. Constructing the habitat from ice will allow natural light to enter the structure while still adequately protecting its inhabitants from solar and galactic radiation.

"While scientists have experimented with what could potentially be synthetic replacements for sunlight, artificial substitutes do not hold nearly the same circadian variance or ability to balance a crew's mental and physical health as does experiencing the sun's actual and unmediated daily cycles," the project's website explains.

Mars ice house concept
Team Space Exploration Architecture and Clouds Architecture Office

Space Exploration Architecture and Clouds Architecture Office, the brains behind the concept, recently took home a $25,000 prize at the Maker Faire event in New York City, beating out 30 other finalists.

"The creativity and depth of the designs we've seen have impressed us," NASA Centennial Challenges Program Manager Monsi Roman said in a news release. "These teams were not only imaginative and artistic with their entries, but they also really took into account the life-dependent functionality our future space explorers will need in an off-Earth habitat."

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