Survival

Cody Lundin

posted: 07/23/12
Cody Lundin
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Cody Lundin
DCL

Cody Lundin is an internationally known professional survival instructor with more than 20 years of hands-on teaching experience. Due to his intimate understanding of the physics, psychology and physiology of human survival, Cody is routinely featured as the consulting expert on real-world emergencies for national and international news outlets. He has trained private, corporate, and governmental agencies, thousands of students and dozens of national and international media sources in outdoor survival, primitive living skills and urban preparedness.

Cody's self-reliance training began early. He created his first survival kit for living on the road after graduating from high school, then boarded a westward bound greyhound bus. He lived on city streets, alone in the woods, and in a radical commune near the Mexican border. Cody further honed his self-reliant expertise living in the deserts and mountains with very little modern gear or assistance - including two years spent living in a brush shelter in the woods where he slept on pine needles and cooked over an open fire.

In 1991 - with an initial investment of ten dollars - Lundin founded the Aboriginal Living Skills School in Arizona, where he teaches modern wilderness survival skills, primitive living skills, urban preparedness, and homesteading. When not teaching for his own school, Cody is an adjunct faculty member at Yavapai College and a faculty member at the Ecosa Institute, where he teaches the survival and sustainability curriculums that he created.

He is also the best-selling author of two books on survival and preparedness: 98.6 Degrees: The Art of Keeping Your Ass Alive! (2003) and When All Hell Breaks Loose: Stuff You Need to Survive When Disaster Strikes (2006). Both books have been translated into several languages and are routinely featured in the top ten best-sellers for their genre on Amazon.

Lundin lives in a self-designed, off-the-grid solar earth home in the high-desert wilderness of Northern Arizona. There, he catches rain, composts waste and pays nothing for heating and cooling. Cody has been going barefoot for more than 20 years, part of his indigenous self-reliant philosophy. He is the only person in Arizona with a license to catch fish with his hands.

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