Top 100 Shark Facts

  • Why is it called Pacifico Clara? “Clara” signifies “clear” in Spanish, and refers to both the beautiful water along the Pacific coast and the clean filtered beer.
  • Why is it called Pacifico Clara? “Clara” signifies “clear” in Spanish, and refers to both the beautiful water along the Pacific coast and the clean filtered beer.
  • Why is it called Pacifico Clara? “Clara” signifies “clear” in Spanish, and refers to both the beautiful water along the Pacific coast and the clean filtered beer.
  • On Pacifico Beer’s label, there’s a lifering surrounding a distinctive looking hill. That hill is located in Mazatlán, Mexico where it’s known as “Cerro del Crestón.”
  • On Pacifico Beer’s label, there’s a lifering surrounding a distinctive looking hill. That hill is located in Mazatlán, Mexico where it’s known as “Cerro del Crestón.”
  • On Pacifico Beer’s label, there’s a lifering surrounding a distinctive looking hill. That hill is located in Mazatlán, Mexico where it’s known as “Cerro del Crestón.”
  • Pacifico Beer was first brewed in Mexico in 1900 by a group of German settlers, who started the brewery.
  • Pacifico Beer was first brewed in Mexico in 1900 by a group of German settlers, who started the brewery.
  • Pacifico Beer was first brewed in Mexico in 1900 by a group of German settlers, who started the brewery.
  • In the early 1970s, surfers from Southern California discovered Pacifico Beer in Baja, Mexico and brought it back to the U.S. This made them the beer’s first importers.
  • In the early 1970s, surfers from Southern California discovered Pacifico Beer in Baja, Mexico and brought it back to the U.S. This made them the beer’s first importers.
  • In the early 1970s, surfers from Southern California discovered Pacifico Beer in Baja, Mexico and brought it back to the U.S. This made them the beer’s first importers.
  • Between 30 and 80 percent of a shark's flesh is made of water. A protein network gives the flesh its structure
  • One of the Lord Mayors of London was a shark attack victim in 1749. Brook Watson lost his leg to a shark while docked off the coast of Cuba
  • Shark teeth are popular and often inexpensive beach souvenirs. Sharks shed their teeth constantly; an occurrence from which humans benefit
  • Of the roughly 50 shark attacks reported each year, only 10% prove to be fatal. So while an attack is rare, dying from one is even rarer
  • As sensational as shark attack newspaper headlines are, the reality is that you are more likely to be bitten by another person than a shark
  • While many people consider sharks to be the world's deadliest animal, you are more likely to be killed by hornets, wasps, bees, or dogs
  • Certain shark species (such as great white) will drown if they stop moving. They lack necessary muscles to pump water through their mouth
  • Overfishing has dangerous effects on sharks such as the whale shark, who has to reach 30 years of age before it can reproduce #sharkweek
  • From 1580 to 2007, there were 64 reported fatal great white shark attacks. Sharks don't fare as well; millions of them are killed every year
  • Sharks' livers contain lots of oil. This makes the liver a relatively buoyant organ, which helps sharks keep their balance in the water
  • Although heavily fictionalized, Jaws was based on a real attack in 1916, when 4 people were killed by a shark off the New Jersey coastline
  • A common shark myth is that they don't attack in the middle of the day, coincidentally when most beach-goers leave the water to eat lunch
  • Sharks do not follow the same three-meals-a-day eating schedule as humans do. They eat when they find food, regardless of time and hunger
  • Punching a shark in the nose or poking its eyes can help to fend it off during an attack. Most sharks don't want to work hard for their food
  • While more likely to die from drowning, surfers can succumb to shark attacks because of their boards, which to great whites resemble seals
  • Almost all sharks like to do their hunting solo, but scalloped hammerhead sharks prefer to travel in schools during their summer migration
  • Tiger, great white, and bull sharks perpetrate most attacks on humans. They hunt human-sized prey and are capable of inflicting fatal bites
  • 20% of sharks are close to extinction because of commercial fisheries accidentally catching sharks with their hooks and nets #sharkweek
  • If a shark bites you, it probably won't take a second taste. They typically bite, then let go after realizing they're not eating sea animals
  • Sharks that eat their siblings' eggs in the womb are not vicious. They are just seeking nutrients for sustaining their own growth #sharkweek
  • Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket Island were inspirations for the fictional town of Amity Island in Steven Spielberg's 1975 thriller Jaws
  • Jaws may have caused a decline in beach attendance in the 1970s, even though great white sharks are fairly uncommon in northeastern waters
  • Great white sharks eat 11 tons of food each year, while humans eat roughly half a ton of food during the same amount of time #sharkweek
  • You don't have to be in the ocean to see a shark. Bull sharks love freshwater, and have been spotted in bays, lagoons, and rivers #sharkweek
  • Most shark species can be found in open water, allowing them plenty of space to swim and an abundance of fish to eat #sharkweek
  • The goblin shark lives along outer continental shelves and underwater mountain ranges. Their dwellings are too deep for human exploration
  • For tiger shark moms-to-be, two different uteri are the key to giving birth to multiple pups #sharkweek
  • Whale sharks are the world's biggest fish, with big families, too. One whale shark can give birth to 300 live shark pups in one litter
  • Blue sharks are among the most threatened shark species in the world. Overfishing and trade in fins have caused the population to decline
  • Until recently, sharks were thought to be immune to cancer, but the latest scientific research proves otherwise #sharkweek
  • Most shark attacks on humans occur within a few hundred yards of shore, because that is where people are most likely to be #sharkweek
  • One way to study sharks in the wild is through tracking devices that send updates to researchers, such as the Smart Position-Only Tag (SPOT)
  • SPOT records sharks' activities and transmits data to a satellite. Pop-Up Archival Tags (PAT) record details of the sharks' environments
  • The frilled shark's circular mouth, filled with more than 300 spiny teeth, earns it the nickname of the modern Loch Ness Monster #sharkweek
  • Most sharks live in saltwater, so how do river sharks survive in freshwater? They absorb extra water then urinate into streams around them
  • Shark fin soup is a delicacy in China and is served at important events like weddings and anniversaries. The dried fins resemble noodles
  • While shark fin soup is a Chinese tradition, the primary downside to finning is that it causes the deaths of 73 million sharks every year
  • While shark fin soup is a Chinese tradition, the primary downside to finning is that it causes the deaths of 73 million sharks every year
  • Exactly how a shark comes into the world depends on its species. Horn sharks, for example, hatch from egg cases called "mermaid's purses"
  • You'd need much more than a "bigger boat" to track down the shark responsible for an attack. Sharks can travel hundreds of miles in a day
  • Despite rumors to the contrary, shark cartilage doesn't reduce the growth of tumors in humans, and can have negative side effects #sharkweek
  • You may think of sharks as ravenous, man-eating sea terrorists, but only 20 of the 350+ shark species are known to attack humans #sharkweek
  • Shark attacks occur near California because U.S. Govt protection of sea mammals has increased their populations, creating more shark food
  • While many of us have learned to fear sharks, they are the ones who should fear us. Humans kill 73 million sharks annually #sharkweek
  • Sound waves travel fast and far in water, so sharks have no trouble picking up low-pitched noises from movements such schools of fish
  • Humans are the #1 predator of sharks, but killer whales, crocodiles, and seals have been known to eat them as well #sharkweek
  • Large sharks have been known to target smaller, younger sharks that serve as easily attainable prey #sharkweek
  • Even though sharks have razor-sharp teeth, they don't use them for chewing prey. They are for ripping; resulting chunks are swallowed whole
  • Sharks aren't color blind. Divers have claimed that sharks are attracted to certain colors, such as the "yummy yellow" of some wetsuits
  • While color preference is debatable, scientists know that some sharks have developed cones like the ones humans use to distinguish colors
  • The prehistoric shark Megalodon probably grew to 60 feet (18 meters), and it is popularized today as the largest shark ever #sharkweek
  • Galeophobia is the excessive fear of sharks. It comes from the Greek word "galeos", which was a particular type of shark #sharkweek
  • Be glad you're not a shark, moms! The gestation period for a pregnant female shark can range from five months to two years #sharkweek
  • Be glad you're not a shark, moms! The gestation period for a pregnant female shark can range from five months to two years #sharkweek
  • Sharks can generate up to 40,000 pounds per square inch of pressure in a single bite. That's easily enough to chomp off a limb #sharkweek
  • Swimming in cold water boosts the odds of surviving a shark attack. Cold water drops your body temperature, which will slow your blood loss
  • Sharks' sightlines span nearly 360 degrees. They have only two blind spots: one in front of the snout and the other directly behind the head
  • Hammerhead sharks are nomadic, travel from Florida coasts to polar regions and adapt to different temperatures through aquatic globetrotting
  • There are at least 350 shark species in the world's oceans today. They vary in shape, but have similar characteristics such as large livers
  • Some female sharks use sperm from multiple males to reproduce, making the pups half-siblings, even though they're born at the same time
  • Angel sharks, also known as sand devils, dig themselves into piles of sand and wait for unsuspecting fish to pass by before attacking
  • 6 years before Steven Spielberg's Jaws, Burt Reynolds starred in Shark. Real sharks were used in filming, and a stuntman was actually killed
  • Whale sharks are much larger than the average shark, but are friendly filter feeders, using their rows of teeth to eat plankton, not humans
  • A shark's size relates to where it hunts: smaller sharks feed near the ocean floor, while larger sharks hunt in the middle ocean depths
  • Some sharks start working before they're even born, chewing their way out of their egg to enter the open ocean
  • The Aztecs attached strings of chili peppers to their canoes to keep sharks away, a practice that modern day scientists doubt was effective
  • The Aztecs had a mastery over sharks. In 1978, archaeologists uncovered remnants of shark bodies under the ruins of the Aztec Great Temple
  • Recreational shark fishing wasn't popular until the 1975 premiere of Jaws, after which people wanted to snag a "man-eating" great white
  • Recreational shark fishing wasn't popular until the 1975 premiere of Jaws, after which people wanted to snag a "man-eating" great white
  • Blue sharks are piggy eaters. They'll keep eating until they regurgitate, after which they go back to eating!
  • Electroreception allows sharks to notice changes in saltwater electricity conduction. Blood changes conductivity and sharks can smell it
  • Sharks hunt for food, not for sport, but follow the same habits as serial killers do, stalking their unsuspecting victims until death
  • Electroreception allows sharks to notice changes in saltwater electricity conduction. Blood changes conductivity and sharks can smell it
  • A great white shark rolls its eyes into the back of its head when it attacks to protect its eyes from debris and the thrashing of its prey
  • Magnets in the water can interfere with a shark's electroreception, but sharks have to get very close to magnets before they're affected
  • Sharks whip their prey around in order to break off chunks of meat, so if bitten, latch on to the shark if you want to save your limb
  • Kazim Doku designed a car modeled a shark body. It's a hovercraft that won Audi and Milan's Domus Academy's 2008 Desire Design Competition
  • Sharks can use heartbeats to track their prey. They have electricity-sensing nodules on their noses called ampullae of Lorenzini #sharkweek
  • You can't see a shark's ears, but their inner ears can track sounds of their prey from lengths of more than 800 feet (244 meters) #sharkweek
  • Signs that a circling shark will attack: it will hunch its back, lower its pectoral fins (fins near its belly) and swim in zigzag motions
  • Unlike humans, whose upper jaw is a fixed part of the skull, sharks can dislocate and protrude their upper jaw to grab and hang onto prey
  • Sharks have always had a bad rap. Ancient Greek historian Herodotus claimed that sharks destroyed a Persian fleet in the 5th century B.C.E.
  • Sharks have an astounding sense of smell, so powerful that they can detect a single drop of blood in an Olympic-sized pool
  • Different sharks have different etiquette for feeding. Caribbean reef sharks, for example, have a pecking order catering to large sharks 1st
  • Sharks can see in murky water because of a membrane called the tapetum lucidum that makes their eyes more sensitive to light #sharkweek
  • Volusia County, FL has had more shark attacks than anywhere else in the world (210 attacks since 1882) #sharkweek
  • Great white sharks are picky eaters, and can determine after one bite whether or not the meal will satisfy its nutritional needs #sharkweek
  • The megamouth shark wasn't discovered by scientists until 1976, and there have only been 41 known sightings of the species #sharkweek
  • Through lateral line organs, sharks can feel waves of pressure with the sensitivity of a physical touch and detect the movement of an object
  • Not all sharks are identifiable as predators, especially the cookiecutter shark, which can camouflage itself using its glowing underside
  • Pygmy sharks are among the tiniest in the world. They measure an average of 8 inches (20 centimeters) in length and can make their own light
  • Sharks move like airplanes. They create forward movement with their tails (like propellers) and water moves over their fins like wings
  • Researchers have discovered common objects (tires, gasoline tanks, and license plates) left intact inside the stomachs of tiger sharks
  • Researchers have discovered common objects (tires, gasoline tanks, and license plates) left intact inside the stomachs of tiger sharks
  • Sharks use geographic profiling, which pinpoints locations where attacks are likely to happen such as fish travel routes, reefs and channels
  • Hammerhead sharks' oddly shaped heads, called cephalofoils, are equipped with electrical sensors, making them superior hunters #sharkweek
  • Sharks are susceptible to the moon's control of ocean tides. Moon phases affect sharks' eating habits and draw them closer to shore
  • Modern sharks breathe by ram ventilation, a method that forces water into their mouths and then processes it as they swim forward #sharkweek
  • When the USS Indianapolis was attacked by a shark during World War II, 900 sailors were stranded in the Philippine Sea near Guam for 4 days
  • When the USS Indianapolis was attacked by a shark during World War II, 900 sailors were stranded in the Philippine Sea near Guam for 4 days
  • A shark's tooth-shaped scales, called denticles, allow it to move swiftly through the water without collecting barnacles and algae deposits
  • When some shark embryos develop teeth, they eat their unborn siblings until one shark remains. This is known as intrauterine cannibalism
  • Sharks respond to a sound known as a "yummy hum". It's an infrasonic sound that injured fish make, drawing sharks to an easy meal #sharkweek
  • Almost 50 different shark species have light-emitting organs called photospheres. Sharks use their light for camouflage and to attract mates
  • Every once in a while, a female shark can reproduce without any contact from a male. This act is known as parthenogenesis #sharkweek
  • Sharks can heat their eyes using a special organ next to a muscle in their eye socket, allowing them to continue hunting in frigid waters
  • Great white sharks off the coast of Seal Island, Africa are known to jump 10 feet (3 meters) in the air for unsuspecting seals #sharkweek
  • It’s a misconception that shark cartilage can help cure cancer. Scientists have known for years that sharks get cancer just like us.
  • One of the earliest relatives of modern sharks, the Bandringa had a head covered in spikes, a long snout and a protruding jaw.
  • A lengthy study completed in 2013 has found that shark moms go home — to the place where they were born — to give birth to their young.
  • A 70-million-year-old piece of shark poop shows that baby turtles were a part of at least some ancient sharks’ diets.#sharkweek
  • A new species of megamouth shark was identified in 2013. It lived 23 million years ago and had pointier teeth than its modern cousin.
  • Ancient sharks survived the Great Dying Event that killed 95% of ocean species 250 million years ago, likely by using deep sea refuge.
  • Sharks have a nictitating membrane that protects their eyes when they feed. Some sharks even roll their eyes back for extra protection
  • Some sharks walk instead of swim, using their fins like legs to stroll across the ocean floor. #sharkweek
  • There are nine known species of walking shark. #sharkweek
  • Scientists are developing a small army of underwater robots that can follow and continuously monitor tagged sharks. #sharkweek
  • The foot of a duck-billed dinosaur was found with a shark tooth inside it, proving that sharks once scavenged or even hunted dinosaurs.
  • Shark body design stabilized 140 million years ago – about 300 million years after sharks first evolved – and remains the same today.
  • A fossil bed discovered in Europe suggests that the waters off of France and the U.K. teemed with sharks 100-72 million years ago.
  • A recent scientific study found that a single litter of sharks can have more than one father – in fact, in some cases, up to five!
  • One prehistoric shark had sharp teeth and head spikes that gave it a devilish appearance, thus its name: “devil tooth.” #sharkweek
  • Until 1667, fossilized Megalodon teeth were thought to be the petrified tongues of dragons and snakes. #sharkweek
  • Megalodon – a prehistoric shark that lived 28 to 1.5 million years ago – measured nearly 60 feet long and preyed on large whales.
  • At 40 feet long, the whale shark dwarfs the world’s smallest shark, a puny 7 inches. #sharkweek
  • That’s a shark of a different color. Unlike the typical gray or brown, some shark species are pink, yellow or blue. #sharkweek
  • Sharks tan too. Some hammerheads swim near the ocean’s surface since darker skin means better camouflage. #sharkweek
  • An angelshark can ambush its prey in one-tenth of a second, popping up from its well-concealed hiding spot. #sharkweek
  • The ocean’s “Permanent Midnight” zone, over 3000 feet deep, is home to sharks. Some swim all the way to the surface for food.
  • Shark or snake? Some carpetsharks – which have carpet-like patterns – resemble snakes because of their long tails and thin bodies.
  • Nurse sharks usually only bite humans when provoked. One diver kissed a sleeping nurse shark and got bitten back on his lips
  • Unlike other sharks, the wobbegong latches on to prey and doesn’t let go. That means deep bite wounds for unlucky swimmers.
  • The wobbegong shark can’t swim very well. The ambush predator instead lurks on the ocean floor, sometimes not moving for days at a time, and snatches nearby food.
  • Shark myths busted: People think they can, but sharks can’t smell blood right away. They don’t smell blood until it reaches their nostrils.
  • Sharks are silent killers. They don’t make vocal sounds because they don’t have vocal cords. #sharkweek
  • An extinct shark called the helicoprion had a circular blade of teeth in its mouth. It looked like the world’s first pizza cutter!
  • The dogfish shark inspired the Dogfish Woman myth. The Haida have celebrated this woman who transforms into a shark for over 100 years.
  • Parasites grab onto the eyes of Greenland sharks. But the pests glow in the dark, attracting shark prey. So both animals benefit.
  • Swallow don’t chew. Sharks do not chew their food like people do. The nurse shark sucks prey into its mouth like a vacuum. #sharkweek
  • Sharks want variety in their diets too. In an aquarium, a shark will refuse food if it has eaten the same thing too many times.
  • The aptly named cookiecutter shark chomps down and leaves cookie-shaped bites on its food. A small souvenir scar for prey that escapes.
  • Feeding frenzy! Hundreds of sharks fight over flesh to eat. Some even bite one another in the chaos. #sharkweek
  • Swell sharks puff themselves up like balloons. This doubles their size and keeps predators at bay. The release of air sounds like a bark
  • Sharks don’t always win against seals. Seals toss puffadder shysharks into the air before chowing down on the 2-foot-long fish.
  • Sixgill sharks can have up to 100 pups (baby sharks) at a time. #sharkweek
  • How do sharks date? Male sharks find mates by biting female sharks. Ouch. Cats and turtles also bite potential partners. #sharkweek
  • Parasitic organisms live inside a great white shark’s mouth. No one knew about this until Shark Week bite cams revealed footage of it.
  • Bull Sharks are known as “the wastebaskets of the sea” because they’ve been found with human garbage in their stomachs. #sharkweek
  • A new species called the bamboo shark was discovered in 2013. The tiny fish walks – not swims – along the ocean floor! #sharkweek
  • Unlike most shark meat, Greenland shark flesh is poisonous. Eating it causes an extreme drunken-like state. #sharkweek
  • The poisonous Greenland shark can be eaten if prepared properly. Preparation takes five months and is a delicacy in Greenland.
  • The Greenland shark is a mysterious giant. No one had photographed the fish in its natural environment until 1995. #sharkweek
  • Greenland sharks can swim 2,200 meters (over 7,200 feet) below the surface. They are only sub-Arctic shark. #sharkweek
  • Greenland sharks eat pretty much anything. Two men in Newfoundland rescued the large shark from choking on a moose. #sharkweek
  • Like great whites, Greenland sharks eat seal. But they also have eaten polar bears, horses, moose and even reindeer. #sharkweek
  • You know the videos of great whites leaping out of the water? This behavior is known as breaching and mostly occurs in South Africa.
  • Great whites jump to chomp on seals but stay below the surface usually. In South Africa, they leap because of competition for food.
  • Underwater photographers: watch out. Cameras emit electrical signals that sharks can mistake for food. #sharkweek
  • Sleep walking causes problems for some people, but what about sleep swimming? Dogfish sharks swim while they sleep. #sharkweek
  • In aquariums, sharks bond with staff. Sharks behave differently with humans they know well than they do with strangers. #sharkweek
  • Off the coast of Coasta Rica, Cocos Island is home to over 40 shark species, especially hammerheads. #sharkweek
  • Can you train a shark? In a Chicago aquarium, some sharks have been trained to recognize sounds and respond to human touch. #sharkweek
  • Oceanic whitetip sharks feed on shipwreck survivors. That’s why Jacques Cousteau called them “the most dangerous sharks in the ocean.”
  • Endangered oceanic whitetip sharks are vulnerable to overfishing because their large fins are used in shark fin soup. #sharkweek
  • Blue sharks are world travelers. They migrate from New York to Brazil, 3,740 miles, to move into cooler waters. #sharkweek
  • To show his romantic interest, a male blue shark will bite a female – hard. Many shark species use this mating technique. #sharkweek
  • Female blue sharks develop tough skin to protect them from male sharks. Males bite females during mating rituals. #sharkweek
  • Blue sharks are overeaters. Sometimes, they devour schools of fish, vomit, and keep eating! #sharkweek
  • Bull sharks swim where people swim – in shallow, fresh water. Bulls swam in Lake Pontchartrain after Hurricane Katrina. #sharkweek
  • Bull sharks can’t see well through their tiny eyes and swim in murky waters. With poor vision, it’s easier to mistake people for prey.
  • In native Hawaiian mythology, tiger shark eyeballs are considered to have magic powers. #sharkweek
  • Shark blood contains a compound that stops it from clotting. Scientists are studying this compound to help people with heart disease.
  • Barnacles and bacteria do not usually grow on sharks. Scientists want to use shark skin to treat bacterial infections in people.
  • In many shark species, female sharks are larger than male sharks. #sharkweek
  • The whale shark’s mouth stretches up to 15 feet wide, the largest mouth of all shark species. #sharkweek
  • At 30 feet long, the basking shark swims with its massive mouth open. Plankton and fish swim into its mouth, an easy meal. #sharkweek
  • No one knows how many goblin sharks are in the deep ocean. An earthquake in China caused 100 goblin sharks to wash up on shore.
  • Great white sharks inspired the design of submarines, since the shark’s body helps its speed and precision. #sharkweek
  • When battling orcas, great whites don’t always win. But neither do orcas. So it’s an ongoing fight for top of the food chain.
  • In 2003, an orca attacked a great white shark by ramming into it, leaving it stunned and vulnerable before eating it. #sharkweek
  • Great whites jump to catch seals. They hit seals with as much force as a car crash, stunning the seals before chowing down. #sharkweek
  • The vegetarian sharks in the movie Finding Nemo are a great white, a hammerhead, and a mako shark. #sharkweek
  • Do sharks have fun? Porbeagle sharks toss around chunks of seaweed to play a shark version of football. #sharkweek
  • Made famous by the movie Jaws, the U.S.S. Indianapolis shipwreck during World War II left over 800 people in shark-infested waters.
  • Hundreds of shipwreck victims on the U.S.S. Indianapolis lost their lives, some due to hungry oceanic whitetip sharks.
  • Great whites are the most notorious man-eaters. But they do not like the taste of humans, often biting and releasing attack victims.
  • Of the over 500 kinds of sharks, only four are considered dangerous to humans: oceanic whitetips, bulls, tigers, and great whites.
  • Want to avoid a shark attack? Don’t splash and don’t wear jewelry. Sharks are attracted to splashing and sharp color contrasts.
  • Curious sharks like colors that contrast. So, an uneven tan line can attract a shark. #sharkweek
  • Over the last thirty years, almost 250 species of sharks have been discovered. Who knows how many species haven’t been found!
  • The giant prehistoric shark Megalodon chomped on whales, with the most powerful bite of any animal that’s ever lived. #sharkweek
  • A great white shark bite has 1.8 tons of force, but its prehistoric relative, the Megalodon used up to 18.2 tons of force. #sharkweek
  • Though great whites are known for hunting humans, humans should not eat great whites because they contain dangerous levels of mercury.
  • Sharks are predictable, but the number of shark attacks isn’t. Human decisions like cage diving and tourism make attacks more likely.
  • Slap of death? Thresher sharks can hit their prey with their long tails, slapping fish to death. #sharkweek
  • Why do shark embryos eat each other in the womb? They have different fathers and compete so one father’s pup is born and not others.
  • Sharks have built-in toothpaste. The exterior of shark teeth is made of fluoride, which is used in toothpaste. #sharkweek
  • Human teeth are as hard as shark teeth, though they are made of different minerals. #sharkweek
  • Shark teeth don’t get cavities. This makes them strong and great for tearing prey. #sharkweek
  • Sharks replace their teeth many times. Sharks don’t lose teeth from cavities, but their teeth get stuck inside prey. #sharkweek
  • Though great whites are predators, they are also scavengers. In a feeding frenzy, sometimes up to 40 great whites eat a whale carcass.
  • A Florida fisherman found a shark baby with two heads. This unusual mutation happens when an embryo does not split fully into twins.
  • Helicoprion, a prehistoric shark, sliced prey like a buzz saw with its 360-degree spiral of teeth. #sharkweek
  • A great white swam across the Atlantic Ocean, from one side to the other. Tracked and tagged by researchers, the shark is named Lydia
  • Oceanographers attached cameras to sharks in 2014. The footage shows the world from a shark’s point of view. #sharkweek
  • Research has shown that sharks are not lazy swimmers, as previously thought, but power themselves through the ocean with their tails.
  • Sharks move slowly in the deep ocean, sometimes swimming in aimless circles. #sharkweek
  • Video research in 2014 shows that sharks can swim in schools of sharks made up of multiple shark species. #sharkweek
  • In an Australian aquarium, a shark was born through artificial insemination for the first time in 2014. #sharkweek
  • Australia’s Melbourne Aquarium hoped to breed endangered bamboo sharks via artificial insemination and succeeded in 2014. #sharkweek
  • Sharks are apex predators. Sitting at the top of the food chain, they do not have any natural predators. #sharkweek
  • Why are sharks important? They keep populations of smaller fish in check. Without sharks, entire ecosystems are disrupted.
  • In Australia, fewer sharks mean more tuna, and smaller fish suffer. Without small fish to eat it, overgrown algae smothers corals.
  • Sharks control fish populations through fear. Fish near sharks are stressed and have problems with reproduction and migration.
  • Of the 72 unprovoked shark attacks in 2013, the most were in Florida, where there were 23 unprovoked attacks. #sharkweek
  • Water sports athletes like surfers accounted for 46 percent of unprovoked shark attack victims in 2013. #sharkweek
  • Grey nurse sharks are called the “labradors of the sea” because of their calm nature. #sharkweek
  • Sydney, Australia shark experts wrestled and rescued an endangered grey nurse shark caught in a plastic cord in 2014. #sharkweek
  • One way to humanely catch a shark? Coax it into a see-through “shark sock,” a large plastic tube that won’t scare the shark. #sharkweek
  • Shark species fear tiger sharks. Video in 2014 shows a school of hammerheads and blacktips banning together to defend against tigers.
  • Scientists developed an instrument in 2014 that uses electrical measurements to show where, when and how much sharks eat. #sharkweek
  • Calcium crystals sometimes mix with cartilage and make it hard. #sharkweek
  • In certain parts of the sharks, such as the jaws and fins, calcification makes the cartilage stronger. #sharkweek
  • Since sharks don’t have marrow, in order to produce red blood cells, their red blood cells are made by the spleen or thymus gland.
  • The thickest animal skin is on whale sharks, it’s up to three and a half inches thick. #sharkweek
  • Shark skin has two layers; the top layer is made up of dead cells, the bottom layer is made of sensory nerve cells, and blood cells.
  • Denticles feel smooth when stroked from front to back and rough the other way. #sharkweek
  • Denticles face away from the direction in which the shark swims in order to reduce drag and friction in the water and increases speed.
  • All sharks have pectoral fins on each side of their body for lift. #sharkweek
  • Sharks have dorsal fins on the back for stability #sharkweek
  • Sharks have caudal fins on the tail that move them forward. #sharweek
  • Sharks spines move back and forth in an S shaped manner. #sharkweek
  • Angelsharks are able hold water in their cheeks and pump them over their gills, this is called buccal (cheek) breathing. #sharkweek
  • The amount of salt in a shark’s body is also regulated by gills, this process is called osmoregulation. #sharkweek
  • Tiger sharks are also known as garbage guts in other regions. #sharkweek
  • Angelsharks are known to live in relatively small areas #sharkweek
  • Carpetsharks have several features in common one is spineless dorsal fins #sharkweek
  • Features that all carpetsharks have are mouths in front of their eyes #sharkweek
  • Another feature that all carpetsharks have are odd looking sensory attachments called barbels. #sharkweek
  • Nurse sharks favor small places and can be found in coves and reefs and often squeeze their body into tight places. #sharkweek
  • Nurse sharks are social and will often share sleeping quarters with other nurse sharks. #sharkweek
  • Wobbegongs are tenacious and won’t let go once they bite into something. #sharkweek
  • Whale sharks have mouths that can get up to fifteen feet wide. #sharkweek
  • Deep sea sharks often tend to have large light colored eyes that allow light to enter their eyes. #sharkweek
  • Sharks that swim closer to the surface often have dark eyes in order to shield light from their eyes. #sharkweek
  • Most sharks have a mirror like reflector at the back of their eyes that magnifies light and lets shark see better in low light.
  • Active sharks have up to 1,500 Ampullae of Lorenzi. #sharkweek
  • Sharks have a series of pockets under their skin that contain sensory hair cells that are called pit organs. #sharkweek
  • There are two species of frilled sharks and four species of cowsharks. #sharkweek
  • Frilled sharks have 300 razor sharp teeth in 25 rows. #sharkweek
  • Dogfish shark hold many records such as being the oldest species #sharkweek
  • Dogfish sharks hold the record for the shark species that have the largest estimated population in the world. #sharkweek
  • Dogfish shark hold the record for the smallest and longest pregnancy having sharks #sharkweek
  • Spiny dogfish have spines on the base of their dorsal fins #sharkweek
  • When spiny dogfish are attacked, they curl up or arch their backs to point the spines at the attacker. #sharkweek
  • Greenland sharks can survive in freezing waters and is the northern most shark. #sharkweek
  • Many small sharks such as blue sharks and angel sharks feed on cephalopods (squid and octopus). #sharkweek
  • Not all sharks’ teeth are the same for example the horn sharks flat teeth crush its food. #sharkweek
  • Chain catsharks often stay motionless on the ocean for days at a time. #sharkweek
  • Filetail catcharks have denticles at the end of their tail so they will be harder to swallow. #sharkweek
  • Shysharks are not aggressive and spend a lot of time resting in protected places. #sharkweek
  • Female bullsharks are pregnant for about 11 months. #sharkweek
  • There are nine species of shark in the hammerhead group. #sharkweek
  • Scalloped hammerhead sharks will sometimes visit “cleaning stations” where small fish clean the parasites off their skin. #sharkweek
  • At night hammerhead sharks tend to leave their schools and hunt alone. #sharkweek
  • Hammerheads can dive up to 1,600 feet but they sometimes swim just beneath the surface when migrating to cooler waters. #sharkweek
  • The small fish you see on sharks are called remoras and have suction cups on their heads that allow them to stick to sharks. #sharkweek
  • Male lago houndsharks are about half the size of the females. #sharkweek
  • The first whale sharks were introduced to the public in Japans Osaka Aquarium Kaiyukan in 2005. #sharkweek
  • Whitetip Reef Sharks hunt at night and often in groups #sharkweek
  • Caribbean Reef Sharks are especially good at hearing low frequency sounds, which alert them to the presence of fish swimming by
  • Grey Reef Sharks are fast swimmers and the most aggressive of the reef sharks. #sharkweek
  • Oceanic whitetip sharks are loners #sharkweek
  • A great white shark can fast as long as three months after a big meal #sharkweek
  • Oceaninc whitetips are considered critically endangered in the Atlantic by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature.
  • Lemon sharks are often used in experiments that test the hearing, vision, and intelligence of sharks. #sharkweek
  • Although Lemonsharks are large and considered to be aggressive, they appear to thrive in aquarium conditions. #sharkweek
  • Bullsharks are territorial and will attack anything that enters its territory. #sharkweek
  • Sharks have the ability to regurgitate their stomachs and swallow it once again. #sharkweek
  • Velvet belly lantern sharks have glowing spines. #sharkweek
  • Dusky sharks are fast swimming predators that are often found hunting in groups. #sharkweek
  • In many species of sharks the females are larger than the males, but male snaggletooth sharks are twice the size of the females. #sharkweek
  • The smallest shark discovered is the Dwarf lanternshark that’s 6.7 inches long. #sharkweek
  • Thresher shark tails can grow to half of their body length and make up a third of their weight. #sharkweek
  • Basking sharks often travel in pairs and sometimes in schools of up to 100 sharks. #sharkweek
  • The whale shark has up to 300 teeth, and the megamouth has more than 90. #sharkweek
  • A goblin shark’s jaw collapses back into its mouth after it finishes eating. #sharkweek
  • Mako sharks are built for speed; their muscles are like propellers that push their bodies forward. #sharkweek
  • A Mako sharks teeth are arranged in a way that makes them visible even when its jaws are closed. #sharkweek
  • The life of a salmon shark is estimated at 30 to 40 years. #sharkweek
  • There were a confirmed 2,463 confirmed unprovoked shark bites around the world between 1588 and 2011; of these only 471 were fatal.
  • More than eighty percent of people who are bitten by sharks live to tell the tale. #sharkweek
  • Sharks are organized into eight orders #sharkweek
  • There are 35 families of sharks altogether #sharkweek
  • There are over one hundred different species of catsharks #sharkweek
  • The frilled shark is considered one of the best examples of what early sharks looked like #sharkweek.
  • Men account for about 90 percent of shark attack victims #sharkweek
  • Sharks can be found in all of Earth’s oceans #sharkweek
  • The liver, not the stomach is the largest organ in a sharks body #sharkweek
  • When it is almost time to give birth, a female shark will lose her appetite to assure she won’t eat her own pups. #sharkweek
  • Most fish have flaps over their gills, sharks don’t. #sharkweek
  • There are three living species of Thresher sharks #sharkweek
  • Nurse sharks are non-migratory sharks and can adapt to colder water temperatures. #sharkweek
  • Sharks have some of the largest brains among fish and have shown multifaceted social behavior. #sharkweek
  • The scalloped hammerhead shark is the first of the shark species to be put on the US endangered animals list #sharkweek
  • Frilled sharks are known to have a gestation period of over three and a half years #sharkweek
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