Primeval Caveman Wearing Animal Skin Holds Sharp Stone and Makes First Primitive Tool for Hunting Animal Prey, or to Handle Hides. Neanderthal Using Handax. Dawn of Human Civilization

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Primeval Caveman Wearing Animal Skin Holds Sharp Stone and Makes First Primitive Tool for Hunting Animal Prey, or to Handle Hides. Neanderthal Using Handax. Dawn of Human Civilization

Photo by: gorodenkoff

gorodenkoff

Curiosity Daily: Neanderthal Roommates, Sea Dragons, Hidden Egyptian

Hear about a new archeological site that suggests humans arrived in Europe 10,000 years earlier than previously thought, what a giant fossil could teach us about the fearsome sea dragon, and a massive archeological find in Egypt!

September 01, 2022

European humans.

Dragons of the sea.

Lost city.



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