Curiosity Daily Podcast: Could Science Stop Aging? And the Milky Way’s “Broken Arm”

Learn about how research into senescent cells and senolytic drugs could change aging. Plus: the Milky Way’s broken arm.

September 30, 2021

Episode Show Notes:

Additional resources from Andrew Steele:

The Milky Way has a 3,000-light-year-long "break" in its arm, and we don’t know why by Briana Brownell

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