Hammerhead Sharks

Learn more about this distinctive shark, named for the unusual shape of it's head.

Related To:

Photo By: Ken Kiefer 2

Photo By: Arturo de Frias photography

Photo By: by wildestanimal

Photo By: Janos

Photo By: EXTREME-PHOTOGRAPHER

Photo By: negaprion

Photo By: LagunaticPhoto

Photo By: by wildestanimal

Photo By: LagunaticPhoto

Hammerhead Sharks

Hammerhead sharks use their head to hunt by pinning their favorite food, stingrays, to the seafloor. They also eat other creatures, such as bony fishes, squid, and lobster.



Hammerhead Sharks

Hammerhead sharks have sensors in its head that help it scan for electrical signals that are given off of creatures’ bodies.

Hammerhead Sharks

Scalloped hammerheads commonly prey on stingrays and aren’t aggressive towards humans.

Hammerhead Sharks

The Northern Rocks, Darwin and Wolf, are considered the best of diving. They can only be reached by an overnight liveaboard from Galapagos main islands. Darwin and Wolf are particularly famous of huge schools of Scalloped Hammerhead Sharks, as well as frequent encounters with the biggest fish, Whale Shark.

Hammerhead Sharks

The great hammerhead can be distinguished from other hammerheads by the shape of its "hammer" (called the "cephalofoil"), which is wide with an almost straight front margin, and by its tall, sickle-shaped first dorsal fin.



Hammerhead Sharks

The great hammerhead is the largest of the 9 species of hammerhead sharks.

Hammerhead Sharks

The great hammerhead shark migrates distances upward of 756 miles alone.

Hammerhead Sharks

Scalloped hammerhead sharks are believed to form huge schools for feeding and reproduction purposes.

Hammerhead Sharks

Bonnetheads are the second smallest hammerhead sharks, averaging 30 to 48 inches.

Shop This Look