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682523337

Photo by: Getty Images/Peter Cade

Getty Images/Peter Cade

Cows Kill More People Than Sharks

By: Joanie Faletto

Sharks are the least of your problems according to these statistics.

November 01, 2019

You've seen "Jaws." You know sharks can be deadly. But in reality, they don't kill very many people each year.

There are approximately five deaths caused by sharks annually, while horses kill about 20 people a year and cows kill about 22. Crocodiles gobble up 1,000 people a year. By spreading malaria, mosquitos kill hundreds of thousands more people than sharks do every year. Deer also cause hundreds of deaths, mostly by running out in front of cars.

Now that you know not to fear sharks, celebrate your knowledge with this very silly LL Cool J song about sharks.

This article first appeared on Curiosity.com.

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