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Octopuses Don't Have Tentacles!

By: Discovery

What exactly do these cephalopods have then?

August 01, 2019

Many people refer to octopus limbs as tentacles, but technically, octopuses don't have any tentacles at all! Instead, they have arms. When you're talking about cephalopods, tentacles tend to be much longer than arms and only have suckers at their "clubbed" ends, whereas arms are shorter, stronger, and suckered all the way down. Tentacles also typically come in pairs. Squid and cuttlefish have eight arms plus a pair of feeding tentacles.

This article first appeared on Curiosity.com.

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