1338273234

1338273234

Rapid antigen testing is a screening tool to help detect COVID-19.

Photo by: Boy_Anupong

Boy_Anupong

Curiosity Daily Podcast: De-agin’ Sensation, Indiana Jones Needs A.I., Rapid-est Test

Today, you’ll learn about a new process that can make cells younger by up to thirty years, the incredible artificial intelligence that is helping piece together the puzzles of ancient texts, and how researchers have developed a rapid test for viruses like coronavirus that is just as accurate as PCR tests and takes only thirty minutes.

May 19, 2022

Episode show notes:

The fountain of youth may be closer than we think.

The overlap between artificial intelligence and the ancient world.

Turns out some things can actually be good, fast, and cheap.

Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to get smarter with Calli and Nate — for free! Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers.

Next Up

Neuroprosthetic Sensory Devices are Reconnecting People to the World

Sensory loss has a profound effect on millions of people’s everyday lives. Sight, hearing, touch, smell, and taste can all be affected, diminishing their experience of the world. But now, thanks to neuroprosthetic technology we can tap into nerve and brain function, and rewire these lost connections.

Digital Twins are a Virtual Replica of Everything

Imagine a world where every car or plane, every patient, every building, or even entire cities have their own virtual, real-time computerized replica--a digital double.

Curiosity Daily Podcast: Zero G Romance, Our Sixth Sense, Oinking at A.I.

Today, you’ll learn about why studying human intimacy in space is necessary for humanity, the mysterious sixth sense human beings have, which is not seeing dead people, and how researchers used artificial intelligence to figure out a way to speak pig.

Curiosity Daily Podcast: How Technology Is Enabling Archeological Discoveries (w/ Elizabeth Sawchuk and Mary Prendergast) and the Privacy Risks of Eye-Tracking Tech

Researchers Elizabeth Sawchuk and Mary Prendergast discuss the surprising discoveries archaeologists are making thanks to new technology. Plus: learn how eye-tracking software can tell you more about you than you think.

Curiosity Daily Podcast: Why Bugs Are Basically Robots (w/ Alie Ward)

Learn about how AI could help predict which drugs won’t agree with women, and why Point Nemo is considered planet Earth’s spacecraft graveyard. But first, Ologies podcast host Alie Ward is back to tell us about her favorite ologie.

Curiosity Daily Podcast: Communicating with Cell-Sized Robots (w/ Cornell University) and Uncanny Valley Science

Learn from Cornell University physicists Paul McEuen and Itai Cohen how cell-sized robots actually communicate with each other and move around. You’ll also learn about the “uncanny valley” and how scientists figured out what part of your brain gets creeped out by human-like robots.

Curiosity Daily Podcast: A Robot That Talks to Itself Might Be Easier to Interact With

Learn about interacting with robots that talk to themselves; “mad honey,” a rare, dangerous hallucinogen; and “alief.”

Curiosity Daily Podcast: A New Robot Can Imagine Itself, Williams Syndrome, and The Great Compression

Learn about why engineers designed a robot that can imagine itself; why the Great Compression was the best time to be alive, financially speaking; and the ups and downs of a rare genetic condition that makes you incredibly loving.

Curiosity Daily Podcast: Anger Looks Guilty, Quantum Microscope, Good News About Cancer

Learn about anger makes you look guilty; a new quantum microscope; and why the fight against cancer is going very well.

Curiosity Daily Podcast: Katherine Johnson’s Legacy, The World’s First Living Robots, and Zinc Doesn’t Cure Colds

Learn about the legacy of the trailblazing NASA mathematician Katherine Johnson; how scientists recently built xenobots, the world’s first living robots; and why zinc probably isn’t as good for colds as you think.