478006334

478006334

A newly hatched piping plover chick (Charadrius melodus) on the beach in Ogunquit, Maine, USA

Photo by: suefeldberg

suefeldberg

Maine: The Battleground for Preserving America's Wildlife

By: Lucy Sherriff

A whopping 55 species are under threat in Maine, and this is the story of the scientists trying to save them.

May 19, 2020

In 1975, Maine passed an endangered species act in response to concerns that a number of wildlife were in danger of completely disappearing from the state. Unfortunately, decades later, there are still tens of animals who are at risk of going extinctaccording to the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife, there are 22 endangered and 23 threatened species. There are also a further 158 species of “special concern”, many of which require intensive monitoring and management.

Scientists and biologists are fervently monitoring these species, which include spotted turtles, marsh birds, New England cottontail rabbits, and the piping plover – to name a few.

It’s a tough battle against a lack of financial resources, invasive species, urban development, disease, and climate change.

New England Cottontails

1205999645

1205999645

Photo taken in Newburyport, United States

Photo by: Greg Nadeau / EyeEm

Greg Nadeau / EyeEm

One species that is particularly suffering from habitat loss is the cottontail, which needs thickets to survive as the scrubland protects them from overhead predators. Just 300 of the species remain in southern Maine, and as a result, landowners are working with state agencies to create sanctuaries for the rabbits to ensure their survival.

“It’s a kind of habitat that you can’t passively protect,” Charlie Todd, a biologist at the state’s wildlife department told the Bangor Daily News. “The land needs to be actively managed.”

Preserving Native Plants

1155884170

1155884170

Photo by: Cavan Images

Cavan Images

But not only are animals under threat, plants are suffering too. Invasive species are endangering up to 350 species of plants, which have been part of long-established ecosystems across Maine. Several of these species are “critically imperiled”, meaning just a few of the plants are known to exist.

One botanist, Arthur Haines, has such a wide repertoire that he can identify more than 2,000 of the plant species that are native to Maine.

Haines, who works for the non-profit Native Plant Trust, is part of a team hoping to save the native plants by preserving their habitats and collecting their seeds to be saved and stored.

An area that is proving key to reviving endangered plant species is Coffin Wild Flower Reservation, which is 177 acres large and home to dozens of rare plant species.

“The seed bank is, basically, an insurance policy for those rare and endangered species,” Michael Piantedosi, the Native Plant Trust’s director told the Maine Public. “It is the reserve that we would use in the event of a catastrophic event.”

And helping save the plant species has a knock-on effect in positively impacting birds and insects that are disappearing, too.

Rise of Bald Eagles

740520027

740520027

An American bald eagle Haliaeetus leucocephalus readies to land on a frozen central Maine lake in January

Photo by: Carl D. Walsh / Aurora Photos

Carl D. Walsh / Aurora Photos

It’s not all bad news, though. The state had notable success in 2009, when the bald eagle, formerly on the brink of extinction in the 1960s thanks to use of a pesticide that weakened the shell of their eggs, was delisted. There are now more than 500 nesting pairs of the species in Maine.

However, funding remains an issue when it comes to protecting biodiversity and reversing declining trends.

“The lack of predictable funding and ability to acquire needed match for federal funds, continues to hamper our ability to ensure the long-term viability of Maine's most vulnerable species,” said a spokesperson for the government.

Next Up

The “Lungs of Our Planet” are Under Threat

World Rainforest Day is June 22, bringing awareness and action to save these precious ecosystems. But if the current rate of deforestation continues, will there be any rainforests in 100 years?

This Giant Ichthyosaur Might Have Been Bigger Than a Blue Whale

This normal-looking reptile may be the largest animal that ever existed.

Rare Blue Ghost Fireflies Only Glow in One Part of North America

These insects emit a glow a yellow-green hue.

What’s Baking in Alaska?

A trending new addition to travel bucket lists around the world is frigid-yet-beautiful Alaska. The poles, the dancing lights, and the winter wonderlands have always attracted the extreme traveler - but this time, there is more than the magical draw of the north that is inviting people up towards the corners of the globe: climate change.

Has the Great Barrier Reef Actually Gone Under?

The Great Barrier Reef is in peril. Is it time for citizens to step up to protect one of the most spectacular ecosystems on Earth?

Two Little Penguin Chicks are Hatched at Bronx Zoo

One-month-old chicks join zoo's growing little penguin colony

New Study from Brazil Makes a Huge Splash in Manta Ray Conservation

One batoid (the skates and rays) that needs no introduction are the manta rays. With 20-ft wingspans, these plankton-loving filter feeders can glide through bright blue oceans as if soaring effortlessly across a cloudless sky.

3 Animals That Mourn Their Dead

Grieving customs aren't just limited to humans.

Saving the Black Bears of the West

Black bears are North America’s most familiar bears. One non-profit is working to reduce state-approved hunting programs in the American West to save the black bears.