Dr. Austin Richards, P.h.D. built a custom ultraviolet camera that allows us to see the additional spectrums of UV light, that many birds have been identified as being able to see. Unlike a UVA or blacklight, the images rely on reflectivity, therefore showing us results in black and white.

Photo by: Ian Shive

Ian Shive

Through the Eyes of Nature: What Animals Can See That We Can't

When scientists began looking closely at a moth’s eye they discovered a nanostructure on the surface of their eyes, which were named the corneal nipple-array. Those tiny little structures essentially assisted the moth in gathering light from the surrounding world it flies through.

August 02, 2021

Recognizing this, scientists began to develop a synthetic coating that could go on glass and lenses - much like my camera lens - that would further enhance the camera’s ability to gather light, thus making it easier to do my job! Though there are almost infinite possibilities with this, from observing galaxies far away, to improving the daily lives of individuals such as myself, the very premise of this begs the question: What else in nature might we learn that can improve our lives?

More From This Show

Nature in Focus | Unseen Nature 04:27

Ian joins the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History while they research the impact of what we can learn from how nature sees the world. No animals were harmed in the making of this video. All animals are part of the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History's collection and come from zoos, private collections and rehabilitation centers.

Without getting too philosophical about we are nature, and nature is us, the simple fact is we live in a world we barely understand. Every day new mysteries are revealed, new discoveries impact our technology, medicine, and entertainment, often all of it is inspired by nature. As a photographer, my job is to capture light, and it’s fascinating to me that there is an entire, hidden world around us that operates in an unseen spectrum of light.

Dr. Austin Richards, P.h.D. built a custom ultraviolet camera that allows us to see the additional spectrums of UV light, that many birds have been identified as being able to see. Unlike a UVA or blacklight, the images rely on reflectivity, therefore showing us results in black and white.

Photo by: Ian Shive

Ian Shive

All of us humans see in RGB (red, green, and blue), but some animals have a superpower! Many birds, for instance, have been discovered to see in the ultraviolet spectrum, which is beyond the ability for us to see. We either need to use a blacklight, which is essentially a consumer-grade UV light also referred to as UV-A, or highly specialized equipment and filters to see the other ultraviolet bands, UV-B and UV-C. This is all super technical, but the gist of it is that this hidden world birds see, when better understood through this invisible light imaging, could have practical applications to improve our technology, medicine, or who knows what!

Our experiment at the incredible Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History was the first step in revealing this world and better understanding it. My job is to document the process and share this story with the world, because in doing so, we make a great argument for nature conservation, in that if we lose these species and lose the natural world… There maybe a whole lot more we are losing that we never even knew was there until it is gone forever.

No animals were harmed in the making of this video. All animals are part of the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History's collection and come from zoos, private collections and rehabilitation centers.

Next Up

The “Lungs of Our Planet” are Under Threat

World Rainforest Day is June 22, bringing awareness and action to save these precious ecosystems. But if the current rate of deforestation continues, will there be any rainforests in 100 years?

Hot Water "Blob" Causes Harm to Wildlife in the Pacific

Rising water temperatures all over the world are causing a multitude of problems for the planet. Recently, a spike in the ocean temperatures is suspected to have led to the death of one million seabirds.

The Real Reason Flamingos Stand on One Leg

Learn about flamingos at discovery.com

Big Sur Condors, A Conservation Comeback Story

Condors once ranged from Baja California all the way to British Columbia. But, in 1987, the last wild California condor was taken into captivity in order to preserve the species. Now, thanks to a breeding program in central California, the condors are finally returning to their natural habitat in Big Sur.

3 Animals That Mourn Their Dead

Grieving customs aren't just limited to humans.

This Giant Mushroom Is the Largest Organism Ever

These fungi are larger than blue whales and dinosaurs!

Sperm Whales Are Loud Enough to Burst Your Eardrums

The world's loudest animal happens to live in the ocean.

How COVID-19 Could Be Good News For Endangered Wildlife

Trafficking of wild animals around the world may be coming to a close, thanks to the novel coronavirus pandemic that is sweeping the globe.

Octopuses Don't Have Tentacles!

What exactly do these cephalopods have then?