WASHINGTON DC, USA - MARCH 9: Elon Musk, Founder and Chief Engineer of SpaceX, speaks during the Satellite 2020 Conference in Washington, DC, United States on March 9, 2020. (Photo by Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

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WASHINGTON DC, USA - MARCH 9: Elon Musk, Founder and Chief Engineer of SpaceX, speaks during the Satellite 2020 Conference in Washington, DC, United States on March 9, 2020. (Photo by Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

Photo by: Anadolu Agency

Anadolu Agency

SpaceX’s Starlink Internet Services Now Active in Ukraine

By: Discovery

Responding to Ukraine’s Vice Prime Minister, Mykhailo Fedorov’s plea on Twitter, SpaceX founder Elon Musk confirmed Saturday that the company’s Starlink satellite broadband service is now “active in Ukraine and more terminals are en route.”

February 27, 2022

The Russian invasion of Ukraine has caused internet disruptions across the country since Thursday, according to monitoring group NetBlocks. “Disruptions have subsequently been tracked across much of Ukraine including capital city Kyiv as Russia’s military operation progresses.” With Russian troops advancing and missiles hitting key infrastructure, Fedorov’s plea was answered.

Starlink is a growing network of satellites capable of providing high-speed internet access across the globe, including many remote areas. SpaceX’s goal is to create a network of 12,000 satellites with the possibility of up to 30,000 more. As of January 15, Musk said that SpaceX had 1,469 Starlink satellites active and 272 moving to operational orbits soon.

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