Curiosity Daily Podcast: Pigeons Can Be Superstitious, Why Allergy Drugs Make You Sleepy, and The 5 Ages of the Universe

Learn about how a psychologist named B.F. Skinner proved that pigeons can be superstitious; the science of histamines and why allergy medications make us sleepy; and the 5 ages of the universe, including the Stelliferous Era we’re in right now.

May 11, 2020

Episode Show Notes:

Pigeons Can Be Superstitious — And a Psychologist Once Proved It by Ashley Hamer

Why do allergy medications make us sleepy? by Cameron Duke

There are 5 ages of the universe, and we're in the Stelliferous Era by Grant Currin

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