Curiosity Daily Podcast: 3M’s 2019 State of Science Index (w/ Jayshree Seth) and How You Can Name Jupiter’s Moons

Learn what the 2019 State of Science Index tells us about the global perception of science with a special guest, 3M Corporate Scientist and Chief Science Advocate Jayshree Seth. Plus: learn how you can name one of Jupiter’s moons.

March 27, 2019

Episode Show Notes:

In this podcast, Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer discuss how you could be the one to name 5 moons of Jupiter, with the following story from Curiosity.com: https://curiosity.im/2u671Vj

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