Curiosity Daily Podcast: Astronomy’s Problem with Starlink (w/ Vivienne Baldassare) and Why Toilet Paper Is White

Learn about Starlink’s unintended consequences for astronomy from astrophysicist Vivienne Baldassare, NASA Einstein Postdoctoral Fellow at Yale University. Then, learn why toilet paper is white.

March 06, 2020

Episode Show Notes:

If you think the night sky should be included in assessments of the environmental impact of government projects, you can get involved in the Council on Environmental Quality’s Proposal to Update its NEPA Implementing Regulations. Comments should be submitted on or before March 10, 2020.

Read the document and submit comments here: https://www.regulations.gov/document?D=CEQ-2019-0003-0001

More information:

Why toilet paper is white by Ashley Hamer (Listener question from Gerald)

Subscribe to Curiosity Daily to learn something new every day with Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer. You can also listen to our podcast as part of your Alexa Flash Briefing; Amazon smart speakers users, click/tap “enable” here: https://curiosity.im/podcast-flash-briefing

Next Up

Curiosity Daily Podcast: Short-Term Pleasures Are Important Too, the Smelly Armpit Enzyme, and a Thorne-Żytkow Object Is a Star Within a Star

Learn about why short-term pleasures are important for your well-being; a Thorne-Żytkow Object, which is what astronomers call a star within a star; and how science identified the culprit for your smelly armpits: Staphylococcus hominis.

Curiosity Daily Podcast: Parents Rarely Pass Their Politics to Their Kids, Source of Peanut Allergies Found in the Gut, and Why Stars Don’t Make the Night Sky Bright

Learn about the perception-adoption model, which says that most parents don’t pass their political ideology to their kids; how researchers found the source of peanut allergies in the human gut; and Olbers’ Paradox, which asks why the night sky is so dark if stars are so bright

Curiosity Daily Podcast: How Loud Is the Sun?

Learn about a simple way to reduce your internet carbon footprint; how brain images can make you more likely to believe fake science; and how loud the sun is.

Curiosity Daily Podcast: This Artificial Sun Is Hotter Than The Real Sun

Learn about an artificial sun that’s hotter than our actual sun; whether math really is a universal language; and what words like “fresh” really tell you about how fancy your food is.

Curiosity Daily Podcast: Moviegoers Blink in Sync, Rain on the Sun, and Why Flamingos Stand on One Leg

Learn about a new discovery about rain on the sun; why flamingos stand on one leg; and why you blink the way you do when you’re watching a movie.

Curiosity Daily Podcast: Differences in CEO and Murdering Psychopaths, How Deep Sleep Cleans Your Brain, and the Mystery of Our Inactive Sun

Learn about how our sun is different from similar stars; how deep sleep literally cleans your brain; and the psychology behind why some psychopaths are serial killers, while others are CEOs.

Curiosity Daily Podcast: Why Religious People Have More Children, Sea Turtles’ Clumsy Navigation Skills, and the Real Center of Our Solar System Isn’t the Sun

Learn the surprising reason why religious people tend to have more children; why sea turtles are actually pretty clumsy navigators; and where astronomers found the center of our solar system (spoiler alert: it’s not the center of our sun).

Curiosity Daily Podcast: Improve Your Self-Control, Replace Your Kitchen Sponge, and Naming Our Sun and Moon

Learn about why the sun and moon don’t have names; why kitchen sponges are grosser than you think (and what to do about it); and how you can improve your self-control with the right feelings of guilt.

You Love Supernova, So How About Micronova?

In space, even the smallest explosions are insanely powerful. Take for instance the newly discovered “micronova,” which sounds cute and cuddly and not at all deadly…except for the fact that it’s the explosive equivalent of a nuclear bomb a million times bigger than Mount Everest.

There’s a Hole in Our Galaxy

Folks, we just found a 500-lightyear-wide hole in our galaxy. Fess up: which one of you did it?

Related To: