Curiosity Daily Podcast: How Loud Is the Sun?

Learn about a simple way to reduce your internet carbon footprint; how brain images can make you more likely to believe fake science; and how loud the sun is.

March 19, 2021

Episode Show Notes:

The internet has a big carbon footprint, and you can reduce yours with a simple fix by Kelsey Donk

You'll Probably Believe Fake Science if It Comes With a Brain Image by Ashley Hamer

How loud is the sun? by Ashley Hamer (Listener question from Noro)

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