Curiosity Daily Podcast: Measure Your Beliefs About the World, the Overview Effect, and a Mercury-Spewing Fountain

Learn about how the overview effect changes your perspective when you leave Earth; why the Calder Mercury Fountain in Barcelona pumps out pure liquid mercury; and, how researchers came up with a set of core beliefs that measure how you feel about the world.

July 30, 2019

Episode Show Notes:

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In this podcast, Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer discuss the following stories from Curiosity.com to help you get smarter and learn something new in just a few minutes:

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