Angry Seagull yelling

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Angry Seagull yelling

Photo by: Thomas Winz

Thomas Winz

Curiosity Daily Podcast: Seeing Stars, Seagull Staredown, Itsy Bitsy Microdrones

Today, you’ll learn about how cultures across the world often make constellations from the same groups of stars due to the nature of vision and perception, what to do when an animal tries to steal your food during a picnic on the beach, and drones smaller than a red blood cell that can be controlled using only the power of light.

May 26, 2022

Episode show notes:

Does your star pattern look like my star pattern?

Staring contests really do work.

Sun doesn’t just give plants life, but drones, too.

Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to get smarter with Calli and Nate — for free! Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers.

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