143153362

143153362

Man drinking pint of beer.

Photo by: Sally Anscombe

Sally Anscombe

Curiosity Daily Podcast: Drink = Brain Shrink, Secret Tree Species, L.H.C. Round 3

Today, you’ll learn about how a single drink a day can add years to the age of your brain, how scientists figured out that thousands of tree species are yet to be discovered, and how the world’s biggest and best particle accelerator is powering up for its third run.

June 30, 2022

Episode show notes:

A drink away does not keep the doctor away.

No, that tree is not the same as that other one.

Imagine two needles smashing into each other.

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