Quitting Smoking, Over-Practicing, Bill Nye on Believing Science

Learn how quitting smoking helps mental health; how to avoid over-practicing; and how to get people to believe science.

January 07, 2022

Quitting smoking is good for your mental health, too by Steffie Drucker

It’s Possible to Practice Too Much by Mae Rice

How to get people to believe science, with special guest Bill Nye (listener question from Michelle via HiHo):

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