Curiosity Daily Podcast: Songs in Tonal Languages (w/ James Kirby) and Neanderthal DNA in Human Chromosomes

Learn how researchers found ancient Neanderthal DNA in human chromosomes. Plus, linguist James Kirby will answer a question about how musicians write songs in tonal languages.

July 14, 2019

Episode Show Notes:

In this podcast, Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer discuss the following story from Curiosity.com about how genetecists found Neanderthal DNA in the dark centers of human chromosomes: https://curiosity.im/2xF98kI

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