Virtual Gathering Tips, Bilingual Pain, Largest Waterfalls

Learn about tips for hosting fantastic virtual gatherings; how language affects pain; and the world’s largest waterfalls.

January 28, 2022

Additional resources from Priya Parker:

Bilinguals feel more pain in the language of their stronger cultural identity by Kelsey Donk

The World’s Largest Waterfall Isn’t What You’d Think by Mike Epifani

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