Curiosity Daily Podcast: Big Five Personality Traits Are WEIRD, Why Mouth Wounds Heal So Quickly, and Snake Island

Learn about why the Big Five personality traits may not be reliable in developing countries; why Brazil's Ilha da Queimada Grande island is full of outrageously venomous snakes; and why wounds in your mouth heal so quickly.

August 14, 2019

Episode Show Notes:

In this podcast, Cody Gough and Ashley Hamer discuss the following stories from Curiosity.com to help you get smarter and learn something new in just a few minutes:

Download the FREE 5-star Curiosity app for Android and iOS at https://curiosity.im/podcast-app. And Amazon smart speaker users: you can listen to our podcast as part of your Amazon Alexa Flash Briefing — just click “enable” here: https://curiosity.im/podcast-flash-briefing.

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